Tabs

Bank/Thrift Supervision   |    Capital    |    CFPB    |    Deposit Insurance    |    Interchange    |    Mortgage Finance
Municipal Advisors   |    OCC-OTS Merger   |    Preemption    |    QM - QRM    |    Swaps   |    Volcker Rule    |    Full Topics List
 
Qualified Mortgage - Qualified Residential Mortgage
Swaps
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau - CFPB
Bank/Thrift Holding Company Supervision
Capital
Deposit Insurance
Interchange
Mortgage Finance
Municipal Advisors
OCC-OTS Merger
Preemption
Volcker Rule
Corporate Governance
Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC)
Appraisals
Office of Financial Research (OFR)
Systemic Risk
Supervision and Oversight
Payment, Clearing and Settlement
Prudential Supervision
Trust & Securities
Asset-Backed Securities
Resolution Authority

Monday, March 7, 2016

Fed Proposes Counterparty Exposure Limits for Large Banks

The Federal Reserve proposed to establish aggregate credit exposure limits for banks and holding companies with more than $50 billion in assets. The exposures addressed would include loans, derivatives, securities lending transactions and others. Required under Section 165 of the Dodd-Frank Act, the proposal significantly revises the Fed’s 2011 proposal on the topic and takes into account the framework proposed by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision in 2014.

For banks with less than $250 billion in assets and less than $10 billion in on-balance-sheet foreign exposures, aggregate net credit exposure to unaffiliated counterparties would be capped at 25% of the institution’s total capital stock and surplus. A second, more stringent limitation would prevent banking institutions with more than $250 billion or more than $10 billion in on-balance-sheet foreign exposures, but that are not global systemically important banks, from having exposures exceeding 25% of tier 1 capital or in excess of 25% of the institution’s tier 1 capital to any other counterparty.

Finally, a G-SIB’s exposure to another G-SIB or nonbank systemically important financial institution would be capped at 15% of tier 1 capital. Comments on the proposal are due by June 3.

Read more.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Please read our comment policy before making a comment.